Cataract Surgery Oculoplastic Procedures Botox Comprehensive

Eye Conditions

Blepharitis

Dry Eye Treatment | Blepharitis Treatment | Retinal Detachment Treatment | Stuart FLBlepharitis is a chronic inflammation - a long-term swelling - of the eyelids and eyelash follicles. It may be caused by seborrheic dermatitis, acne, bacterial infection, allergic reaction or poor eyelid hygiene. The eyes may become red or blurry, as well as tear frequently. The eyelids crust, flake, scale or redden, and the smooth inside lining of the lids may become rough. In more serious cases, sores can form when the crusting skin is removed, the eyelashes may fall out, the eyelids can deform, the infection can spread to the cornea, and patients often suffer from excessive tearing. Blepharitis can also cause styes, chalazions and problems with the tear film.

Treatment and preventative care for blepharitis involves thorough but gentle cleaning of the eyelids, face and scalp. Warm compresses can be applied to loosen crust and dandruff shampoo can help keep the eyelids clear. This may be combined with antibiotics if a bacterial infection is causing or contributing to the problems.


Dry Eye Treatment

Dry eye occurs when the eyes aren't sufficiently moisturized, leading to itching, redness and pain from dry spots on the surface of the eye. The eyes may become dry and irritated because the tear ducts don't produce enough tears, or because the tears themselves have a chemical imbalance.

People usually begin experiencing dry eye symptoms as they age, but the condition can also result from certain medications, conditions or injuries.

Dry eye is not only painful, it can also damage the eye's tissues and impair vision. Fortunately, many treatment options are available.


Retinal Detachment

Dry Eye Treatment | Blepharitis Treatment | Retinal Detachment Treatment | Stuart FLRetinal detachment is a serious eye condition that occurs when the retina becomes separated from the wall of the eye and its supportive underlying tissue. The retina cannot function when these two layers are detached, and without prompt treatment, permanent vision loss may occur. Retinal detachment can occur from injury to the eye or face, or from very high levels of nearsightedness.

To prevent permanent vision loss, the retina must be quickly reattached. Treatment for retinal detachment can be done through surgery or laser photocoagulation. Photocoagulation seals off leaking blood vessels and destroys new blood vessel growth, allowing the retina to reattach. Pneumatic retinopexy, a procedure that creates a gas bubble within the vitreous gel and then expands to place pressure against the retina, can also help with reattachment.


Retinal Tear

Located at the back of the eye, the retina is attached to the vitreous, the gel-like substance that makes up for most of the eye's volume. Although the vitreous begins as a thick substance with a firm shape, the consistency of the gel changes and becomes thinner and more watery as we age. A change in the shape of the vitreous can cause it to pull away from the retina and leave a tear. A retinal tear leaves the retina unprotected and can allow fluid to travel between the retina and the wall, which may lead to retinal detachment.

Retinal tears may occur in patients with myopia (nearsightedness), as the condition may cause the vitreous to pull away from the retina. Although a retinal tear does not cause pain, patients may experience flashes or floaters in their field of vision, a reduction of vision, a shadow or curtain forming in the peripheral vision, or other vision changes. It is important to see your doctor at the first sign of a retinal tear.


Retinal Vein Occlusions

A retinal vein occlusion occurs when an artery supplying blood to the eye hardens or swells and presses on a nearby vein and blocks it, making it difficult for blood to leave the eye. The restricted circulation leads to high pressure in the eye, which can in turn cause swelling, bleeding, growth of abnormal blood vessels, and partial or total vision loss.

Vascular occlusions do not cause a change in physical appearance, and they can occur with no pain or noticeable loss of vision. For these reasons, it is important to have routine eye exams and also to check one's own vision by closing one eye at a time.

Previous 1 2 3 4 5 6 Next

back to top

Text Size________

Locate Our Office

Coastal Eye Center | 304 SE Hospital Avenue | Stuart, FL 34994 | 772-283-8444

Coastal Eye Center

304 SE Hospital Avenue | Stuart, FL 34994
Get Directions

Surgery Center

Coastal Eye Center | 3995 N.W. Goldenrod Road | Jensen Beach, Fl 34957 | 772-497-0020

The Surgery Center at Jensen Beach

3995 N.W. Goldenrod Road | Jensen Beach, FL 34957
Get Directions


Helpful Links

- American Academy of Ophthalmology