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Vitreous Hemorrhage

Vitreous Hemorrhage Treatment | Amblyopia Treatment | Presbyopia Treatment | Stuart FLThe vitreous is the gel-like substance that makes up approximately two-thirds of the eye's volume and is located in between the lens in the front of the eye and the retina in the back of the eye. In normal, healthy vitreous gel, there are no blood vessels, but diseases such as diabetic retinopathy can lead to the development of new blood vessels which can grow into the vitreous gel. These blood vessels are often fragile and susceptible to leaking blood and fluids.

A vitreous hemorrhage occurs when one of these blood vessels ruptures and causes bleeding within the vitreous gel, causing visual symptoms. Normal blood vessels may also rupture, although less common, as a result of force from a retinal tear or detachment. Patients with vitreous hemorrhage usually notice a sudden, significant increase in the number and size of floaters blocking their vision. Severe bleeding can also cause vision to appear blurry, cloudy or hazy.


Amblyopia Treatment

Amblyopia, commonly known as lazy eye, is an eye condition that results in reduced vision in one eye. This condition affects two to three percent of the population as a result of genetic causes, related conditions or trauma. When this condition occurs, the unaffected eye usually becomes stronger and suppresses the amblyopic eye, often rendering it weaker.

Effective treatment for amblyopia depends on the underlying cause of the condition, but may include glasses to improve focusing or eye exercises to correct improper vision habits. Eye drops and patching may also be prescribed. More serious cases or those that do not respond to conservative treatment may need surgery to straighten the eyes so that they can focus together and see properly.

Vision Problems

Hyperopia

Hyperopia Stuart FLFarsightedness, or hyperopia, is the condition in which the eye focuses on distant objects better than on objects closer to the eye, so nearby objects appear blurry. This happens when light rays refract, or bend, incorrectly in the eye. The eye is designed to focus images directly on the surface of the retina; when the cornea is incorrectly curved, light rays focus behind the surface of the retina, producing a blurry image.

Hyperopia can be treated in a variety of ways. The most common is a pair of reading glasses or contact lenses. Hyperopia can also be treated with invasive or non-invasive medical procedures.


Myopia

Myopia Stuart FLMyopia, or nearsightedness, is a vision condition affecting nearly a third of people in the United States. The eye focuses properly on nearby objects, while distant objects appear blurry. This imbalance typically occurs either because the eye has an oblong shape (astigmatism) or the cornea is excessively curved, so that only some of the light entering the eye focuses on the retina.

Nearsightedness may be hereditary, and it may also be caused or exacerbated by frequent close-vision work such as reading. The most telling symptom is difficulty seeing objects in the distance, for example a chalkboard or television screen. Nearsightedness usually develops before the age of 20.

Eye exams test the degree of nearsightedness so your eye doctor can prescribe glasses or contact lenses, which help to properly bend light entering the eye.


Astigmatism

Astigmatism Stuart FLAstigmatism occurs when the cornea, the front surface of the eye, is curved slightly in one direction and causes blurred vision. The cornea refracts (bends) light so it focuses on the retina in the back of the eye. With astigmatism some of that light focuses in front of or behind the retina, so your vision may be blurry for nearby (hyperopia), far-away (myopia) or all objects.

Indications of astigmatism can include headaches, eye strain, fatigue, and blurred or distorted vision. The severity of symptoms depends on the degree of astigmatism in your eyes.

Routine eye exams include testing for astigmatism, which affects many people. Once diagnosed, astigmatism can usually be corrected with prescription eyeglasses or contact lenses.


Presbyopia Treatment

Presbyopia is a natural change in our eyes' ability to focus. It occurs when the soft crystalline lens of the eye starts to harden. This loss of flexibility affects the lens' ability to focus light in the eye, causing nearby objects to look blurry. Presbyopia happens to everyone starting in about our 40s or 50s -- even in patients who have had laser vision correction.

The effects of presbyopia can be corrected with glasses or contact lenses, including bifocals and multifocals; multifocal lens implantation including TECNIS® and ReSTOR®; accommodating lenses such as Crystalens®; conventional surgery; and monovision LASIK.

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Helpful Links

- American Academy of Ophthalmology